Allison Jack has been awarded a one-year postdoctoral training grant

through the National Science Foundation International Research Fellowship Program

 
Enjoying a deluge of black gold at the Worm Power facility

Enjoying a deluge of black gold at the Worm Power facility

Still, the industry suffers from image problems. “It’s hard to bring it out of the ‘It’s cute to have a worm box in my backyard’ approach and put it on par with other strategies for waste management,” said Allison Jack, who earned her doctorate by studying vermicompost at Cornell and is now teaching at Prescott College in Arizona

One-year postdoctoral training grant 

Agroecology faculty member Allison Jack has been awarded a one-year postdoctoral training grant through the National Science Foundation International Research Fellowship Program. She will be living in Wageningen, The Netherlands, home of "Food Valley," the world's largest intersection of food and agriculture researchers, professionals, and multinational corporations. Just as Silicon Valley is known internationally for computer technology innovation, Food Valley is a global hub of food and agriculture technology innovation. Allison will be working in Dr. Jos Raaijmaker's laboratory in the Plant Pathology Department at Wageningen University. 

Global food system in Food Valley

Her research project is titled "Harnessing Biodiversity for Sustainable Agriculture: The Metagenomics of Disease Suppressive Soils." She'll be blogging about her experiences of total immersion in the global food system in Food Valley and her laboratory research adventures at agroecologyaz.wordpress.com. For more information about the research on soils that naturally protect plants from disease in the Raaijmaker lab, please see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-releases/2011/05/05/community-soil-microbes/. Allison will return to Prescott College in Spring 2014 even better prepared to teach about the global food system. She will also be gaining valuable research skills to start up a soil biology lab and field research program in conjunction with the college's new bachelor of science degree in Environmental Studies, using Prescott College Jenner Farm as a field station.

 

New York Times

Allison was recently quoted in the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/science/worms-produce-another-kind-of-gold-for-farmers.html?smid=fb-share&_r=1&

 

"Still, the industry suffers from image problems. “It’s hard to bring it out of the ‘It’s cute to have a worm box in my backyard’ approach and put it on par with other strategies for waste management,” said Allison Jack, who earned her doctorate by studying vermicompost at Cornell and is now teaching at Prescott College in Arizona."

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